Friday, 30 October 2009

Le Grand Trianon I


Okay... I have been showing you some photographs of the Grand Trianon castle's gardens recently. Here it is seen from both sides. A little bit of history: it was built by Jules Hardouin Mansart in 1687 for Louis the 14th, on the spot where a porcelain palace had stood before. It was the king's own personal retreat from the hustle and bustle of court life at the nearby palace.
It is said that there were so many flowers in the garden that the scent became heady. Queen Marie Leszczińska, Louis the 15's wife, also loved the place whereas queen Marie-Antoinette preferred her own estate, and the Petit Trianon castle. Later, emperor Peter the Great of Russia stayed at the Grand Trianon which was also favoured by empress Marie-Louise of Austria, wife of NapoléonI and by Maria-Amalia of the two Sicilies, queen to king Louis-Philippe I. I think that's enough history for today!
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Je vous ai récemment montré quelques photos des jardins du Grand Trianon. Le voici vu pile et face. Allez, un peu d'histoire... Il a été construit en 1687 par Jules Hardouin Mansart pour Louis XIV, là où s'élevait auparavant le palais de porcelaine. C'était la retraite du roi, éloignée de la cour du château, toujours fleurie au point que le parfum en devenait entêtant. Marie Leszczińska, épouse de Louis XV adorait, dit-on, l'endroit, mais Marie-Antoinette lui préférait le Petit Trianon. Plus tard, Pierre 1er le Grand, empereur de Russie, y séjourna et ce fut une résidence aimée de l'impératrice Marie-Louise d'Autriche, épouse de Napoléon 1er, puis de Marie-Amélie de Bourbon-Siciles, la reine de Louis-Philippe 1er. Bon, je crois que ça suffit pour aujourd'hui ! Bon weekend !

17 comments:

Vogon Poet said...

After twenty minutes jumping from a link to another I know something more about this, but I have to say that, not for your fault, it doesn't look inviting...

Jacob said...

Thank for all that history! It's just so interesting to read of all the people who have inhabited these grounds at one time or another...I find them quite beautiful, even though I wouldn't want to live there...but, in another time and another place, it must have seemed like heaven!

That is the chicken said...

Hi! I love that ironwork on the fence..it's beautiful!

Clueless in Boston said...

The ironwork in the first photo is very impressive, as was the history lesson.

Your EG Tour Guide said...

My goodness, that was a lot of history!

You commented on my Sepia Scene post that the cottage looked new to you. Nope, old style. It was probably built in the 20s or 30s...but oops! That probably does seem new after hanging around Versailles. ;-)

Lee Spangler said...

Following European history is such a chore. I imagine the royalty visiting this spot, their clothing,language, the intrigue!

cieldequimper said...

@VP: sorry to have made you link jump like that!

Tash said...

Now there is a lesson for modern architects on how to make a spikey fence beautiful. I love the angle of both photos - one for detail, the other for the size and expanse of the building.

Halcyon said...

I love seeing and hearing about all aspects of the palace. Once my sister, mum and I visted the Grand Trianon. There was a couple getting pretty hot and heavy on the grass. It was quite embarassing. Not the sort of thing you like to see when your parents are around!

James said...

That green metal work looks so fancy. It's amazing how much history has taken place there. It's fun to imagine this place back in the old days.

Cezar and Léia said...

J'aime lire des histoires de plus, je suis étudiant français avec votre blog! Merci!

Je lis le livre du Petit Prince ,c'est bon et dans la compréhension Frances.
Toutefois, je voudrais acheter plus de livres de littérature française, suggestions(?)- I mean clue - sont bienvenues! :)
Cet endroit est merveilleux!
Léia

Asta said...

Hi C,

Wow. Thank you for this very interesting post.

Best regards
Asta

Cergie said...

Tu ne nous a pas tout dit : sais tu le nom de ces petits hérissons hirsutes et protecteurs sur le coté des grilles (à mon avis plutôt contre les bestioles que contre les humains). J'en ai vu à St Jean de Beauregard et à La Roche Guyon, mais celui-là a des proportions royales.
Ah mais, c'est qui le chef de la Gaule ?

Vogon Poet said...

@ ciel - Don't be sorry, liked everything I read. It's for me easy to get lost in a chain of interesting links...

tapirgal said...

I love the metal "plant" with spiky flowers on it. It's amazing that they had so many choices of where to live and stay. I always dream of being that wealthy. But I really didn't realize Versailles was THAT big. I'll have to go on my next visit :)

Sharon Van Lieu said...

How interesting. Now I'm going to google porcelain palace. :-)

Sharon

Captain Shagrat said...

Nice classy shots here. Those scent filled gardens must have been a relaxing place to idle away the hours. Iv'e got garden envy now ;-)