Wednesday, 2 September 2009

La chapelle de Clagny

This chapel is located in the verdant and leafy residential area of Clagny. It was constructed in 1885 but has ceased to be used for holy mass since the 1920s and now serves as chaplaincy for two Versailles schools as well as parish house for the neighbourhood.
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La chapelle se situe dans le quartier verdoyant et résidentiel de Clagny. Elle a été construite en 1885 mais dès les années 1920, elle cesse d'être un lieu de culte. Elle sert aujourd'hui d'aumônerie pour les collèges Hoche et Clagny ainsi que de maison paroissiale pour le quartier.

24 comments:

Vogon Poet said...

This is strange and unusual building, but I like it.

Jacob said...

What is a "chaplaincy"? I agree with VP as to what it looks like. I guess it is assumed that everyone in the Versailles schools are Roman Catholic?

Very interesting.

akarui said...

Il y a bien quelques briques mais les murs sont dans un materiau assez peu courant. Une chapelle originale meme dans ses formes.

James said...

I like this picture and this is a very interesting building. Now I wonder what the inside looks like, but Imagine that it may have lost it's past glory.

gogouci said...

I also have to say that the geometry and symmetry of this building is not ordinary. Very interesting look.

Allan Alexandre said...

Cela baigne dans la spiritualité très vieille mais authentique. Question es-tu la seule avoir un blog de Versailles, autre question as-tu été contacté pour la municipalité parque ce que tu mérite une belle médaille.

Olivier said...

dommage les panneaux, sinon ta photo faisait intemporelle...tres belle architecture,j'aime bien

Lee Spangler said...

Ciel: You do an excellent job again in showing details of your city.The building is odd, only used for 35 yrs. I wonder about its story.

DaveM said...

Is it unusual to see a brick and stone building in that area? Interesting building though I bet those stones could tell a tale or two. We have some stone buildings that were constructed using ships ballast from the port that was unloaded before reloading with coal. Those stones are wonderful for geologists as they come from all over.

Tammie Lee said...

such a lovely building against that gorgeous blue sky!
Spirithelpers

cieldequimper said...

@Olivier : je les aurais bien déplacés les satanés panneaux ! Impossible de prendre la photo sans eux.

tapirgal said...

This is unusual, striking, and beautiful all around. I just love it!

PERBS said...

How interesting that a church has a new use for different clergy needs today! It looks like it was an interesting church and that I bet one could find more information about it on Google or in some reference book.

Cergie said...

Un édifice en meulière... Quelque part il me fait penser aux gares désaffectées (et recyclées aussi), nous en avons autour de Cergy, en meulière aussi toutes sur le même plan. Elle est donc connotée région parisienne, je la trouve chouette, chaleureuse.
Les panneaux ne me dérangent pas, elle est intégrée dans la ville, de plus située à un endroit stratégique.

Cergie said...

[J'aime bien la coupe au bol de l'arbre]

B SQUARED said...

Seems to be unusual stone work. Is this typical of the period?

BaysideLife said...

I love the contrast between the brick and rubble materials. A real little jewel. Glad it is being reused and not torn down.

And yes, we also have summer and winter oysters and here too the best ones are in winter--all those R months!

Halcyon said...

I like this building. It's got a different look to it than the typical architecture you find in France. I'm glad it's still being used as well!

Your EG Tour Guide said...

And I see it has a red door like many churches here in Canada.

Cezar and Léia said...

A beautiful sanctuary!
Great picture and post!
Léia

cieldequimper said...

@ Jacob: the place where the chaplain can be found I guess... Yes, Versailles is overwhelmingly Roman Catholic with an above French average church going population. There are a Protestant temple (which I need to show you!)and a mosque though.
@B Squared and those wondering what the stone is: it's typical for greater Paris, usually end of 19th century to mid 20th century, it's called "meulière". You can see an earlier post explaining about this particular stone by clicking on the Meulière label I have just added.

Asta said...

Hello C,
Beautiful building. Very different but very beautiful. It would be nice to see it from the inside as well. Very interesting.

Best regards
Asta

JM said...

Lovely chapelle and very unusual bell tower!

Dina said...

So unusual. Love the mixed textures. I'm off now to learn more at your Meulière label.