Sunday, 23 November 2014

L'Ecole Boulle

Ecole Boulle château de Versailles
 Not only was the 'XVIIIth century, the birth of design" exhibition an amazingly beautiful collection of furniture masterpieces but there was also a presentation by Ecole Boulle (Boulle School, named after André-Charles Boulle, (1642-1732) the king's cabinetmaker who is generally considered to be the preeminent artist in the field of marquetry.) The young lady above was demonstrating the art of chiselling, while the one below fascinated VDP with the art of marquetry. The exhibition at the palace is visible until 22 February 2015, all the info here on the palace website!

Non seulement l'expo "XVIIIè, aux sources du design" est une extraordinaire collection de chefs-d’œuvre du mobilier, mais elle permet également de voir les techniques utilisées, présentées par l'Ecole Boulle (qui doit son nom à André-Charles Boulle 1642-1732), ébéniste du roi et principal ébéniste de son siècle). La jeune femme ci-dessus montrait les techniques de ciselure. VDP fut fascinée par la marqueterie présentée ci-dessous. L'expo est visible jusqu'au 22 février 2015, toutes les infos par ici sur le site du château.
Ecole Boulle château de Versailles
Ecole Boulle marquetry château de Versailles
Finally, the tools of the trade of cabinetmakers...

Pour finir, les outils des ébénistes...
Ecole Boulle château de Versailles
Ecole Boulle château de Versailles
The presentations were held in the one of the 'crusades' rooms of the palace, created by King Louis Philippe in neo-gothic style in 1843 at the height of fascination with the Middle Ages and crusades. Read about it here and watch a video here (in French).

Les démonstrations avaient lieu dans l'une des salles des croisades, créées par Louis-Philippe dans le style néo-gothique. Plus d'infos à son sujet ici et pour une vidéo sympa, c'est par là.
Salle des croisades crusades room Versailles
Salle des croisades crusades room Versailles

16 comments:

William Kendall said...

The tools and work are fascinating... my dad would really find that interesting. The setting's beautiful!

Randy said...

Wonderful shots. Love that red velvet chair.

Jack said...

It would be fascinating to watch the artisans at their work.

Bob Crowe said...

The second and the third pictures are wonderfully confusing. It reminds me of cubist painting.

Dina said...

I'd love to learn to do stuff like that, old style. Thanks for the great pictures.
That Crusader room will be on my list too.

Stuart said...

As a woodworker myself, I appreciate the tools and the skills these craftsmen/craftswomen have. It's beautiful work.

llandudnopictures said...

Very interesting, and captured expertly too!

Revrunner said...

I especially liked the close-up look at the tools.

Sharon Anck said...

I'm impressed by those young women who are working the trade.

EG CameraGirl said...

Time-consuming work! My husband has done a little but it takes forever!

VP said...

This kind of work is fascinating, I would really like this place!

Lowell said...

You are very fortunate to be able to attend such an exhibition. Can't really imagine how much skill (and time) it took to design and build such furniture!

PerthDailyPhoto said...

How incredibly wonderful it is to see young people learning these age old skills Ciel.. beautiful series of detailed shots.

RedPat said...

It is wonderful to see these old skills being kept alive, Ciel!

Tahiti Daily Photo said...

Très beau et que vivent les "anciens" métiers !

Michelle said...

Wonderful to see these skills being kept alive!