Tuesday, 31 March 2015

VDP hors les murs : un peu de technique

Louis XIV Toile
Detail of the huge toile 'Louis XVI visiting the harbour of Cherbourg', Manufacture Petitpierre et compagnie, Nantes, ca. 1787.
 Détail de la toile "Louis XVI visitant le port de Cherbourg", Manufacture Petitpierre et compagnie, Nantes, vers 1787. 
Now for a little bit of technique! The museum offers a fascinating insight into how the world famous  Toile de Jouy was made in the XVIIIth and XIXth centuries (and even well into the XXth, since other manufactures took over after Jouy stopped). In its heyday, in 1804, the royal (and imperial) manufacture of Jouy employed 1322 workers on 14 hectares (34 acres) and in 83 years of existence, created 30 000 patterns, some of which are still very popular today in fashion and interior design all over the world. Copper plaques like the one below were used to print the toile but also wooden plaques (made from several layers of wood, including pear because of its hardness). For a better view of some Jouy copper plaques, click here to see those exhibited in Versailles' Lambinet Museum. It was fascinating to read about the use of tinctorial plants, such as common madder, dyer's rocket, true indigo...

Allez, un peu de technique ! Le musée de la toile de Jouy explique comment la toile qui a conquis le monde était fabriquée aux XVIIIè et XIXè siècles (et jusqu'au XXè, lorsque d'autres manufactures avaient repris le flambeau). A son apogée, vers 1804, la manufacture de Jouy employait 1322 ouvriers sur 14 hectares et en 83 ans d'acivité, a créé 30 000 motifs. Les plaques en cuivre telle que celle-ci étaient utilisées mais également des plaques de bois, composées de plusieurs essences, dont le poirier, affectionné pour sa dureté. Pour une meilleure vue de plaques en cuivre, cliquez ici pour voir celles conservées au musée Lambinet. A Jouy, ce fut fascinant de s'instruire au sujet des plantes utilisées : garance, gaude, indigotier...
Copper toile de Jouy plaque
Wood Toile de Jouy plaques
Wood Toile de Jouy plaques
XIXth century Toile de Jouy samples
Early XIXth century samples.
Echantillons du début du XIXè siècle.

24 comments:

Geoff Wilkinson said...

Fascinating story, love that first piece of work...

Kate said...

Certainly is labor intensive work to achieve these beautiful patterns. I've seen something similar in India with patterns on fabrics.

William Kendall said...

Beautiful patterns of the time- that first work really appeals to me.

Taken For Granted said...

Interesting to see the tools of this printing process.

Revrunner said...

Without too much difficulty I could see that first image as George Washington crossing the Delaware. Hmm. I wonder if there is a connection? :-)

Randy said...

That is amazing.

Thérèse said...

Explications fascinantes.
Ce billet me fait penser à la bergère gardant ses moutons de la toile de Jouy qui tapissait la chambre que j’occupais chez mes grands-parents pendant les grandes vacances. Mon imagination prenait le relais pendant les siestes imposées…
Plus tard je me suis servie de ces tissus pour faire des appliqués en patchwork.

Kay said...

I had no idea of its history or that this was such a big industry. Very interesting! Thank you!
Am I the only one who wonders that two women are rowing Louis' boat?

llandudnopictures said...

Very interesting and informative!

Josette T said...

a semble si simple maintenant mais quel travail en amont pour un résultat parfait
bel article; merci pour les liens

EG CameraGirl said...

The hours that went into creating these! The details are stunning.

cieldequimper said...

@ Kay: they are sailors.

Tanya Breese said...

ha, i was thinking the exact same thing as revrunner, how funny...ahhh i love toile!

Birdman said...

First one almost looks like a tablecloth. EXPENSIVE for sure. hehehehehe

Sharon Anck said...

This looks like a very informative exhibit. Such beautiful work.

cieldequimper said...

Sorry RR and Tanya, I really don't think there's any connection between the two. More info about the whole Toile and the monarch's visit to Cherbourg harbour can be seen here: http://opac.lesartsdecoratifs.fr/fiche/louis-xvi-visitant-le-port-de-cherbourg

PerthDailyPhoto said...

Well you have to know that as a Francophile I have always loved the various Toile's, these last posts have been a pleasure to see, merci beaucoup Ciel.

Aimeecakes said...

How fascinating! I think I've inherited at least some of mums love of beautiful French things, i do like a good Toile

Halcyon said...

What beautiful examples. I can imagine the hours and hours of work that goes into these tapestries.

RedPat said...

The copper plate is amazing!

Tahiti Daily Photo said...

Impressionnant ! Merci pour ce retour en arrière

Fotolosopher said...

I'm learning a lot from you these past few days. Great fun!

cieldequimper said...

@ Hal: as explained this is printed fabric, not woven tapestry.

VP said...

A fascinating post, I knew almost nothing about this technique. Great pictures, by the way!